Next Week’s Readings

May 26, 2010 at 9:17 pm | Posted in PRATT SILS 684, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

These are the readings for next week. Everybody will present on Wednesday:

Week 3: Legal Information – Research and Management

 Monday, May 31: No class

 Wednesday, June 2: Managing Legal Information

  1.  Sunstein, Cass. Infotopia. How Many Minds Produce Knowledge. Oxford UP (2006), Ch. 5 “Many Working Minds: Wikis, Open Source Software, and Blogs” (to be distributed)
  2. Plotin, Stephanie L. “Legal Scholarship, Electronic Publishing, and Open Access…”. 101 Law Libr. J. 31 (2009)
  3. Riley, Duncan. Memo to journos: why you can’t trust Wikipedia #569 http://www.crikey.com.au/author/nichenet/ & http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2009/0507/1224246059241.html & Cohen, Noam, “Wikipedia: Exploring Fact City” (The New York Times: March 9, 2009)
  4. Pettinato, Tammy R. Legal Information, the Informed Citizen and the FDLP: The Role of Academic Law Librarians in Promoting Democracy, 99 Law Libr. J. 695 (2007).
  5. Palfrey, John. Born Digital. Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives  (all 3 excerpts from http://borndigitalbook.com/)
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  1. Reading Assignments for Week 3

    CHRISTINA — Sunstein, Cass. Infotopia: How Many Minds Produce Knowledge. Oxford UP (2006), Ch. 5 “Many Working Minds: Wikis, Open Source Software, and Blogs” (to be distributed).
    ANN — Plotin, Stephanie L. “Legal Scholarship, Electronic Publishing, and Open Access.” 101 Law Libr. J. 31 (2009).
    JON — Riley, Duncan. Memo to journos: why you can’t trust Wikipedia #569 http://www.crikey.com.au/author/nichenet/ & http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2009/0507/1224246059241.html & Cohen, Noam, “Wikipedia: Exploring Fact City” (The New York Times: March 9, 2009) (https://theprattlawlibrarian.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/1.pdf)
    CHELSEA — Pettinato, Tammy R. Legal Information, the Informed Citizen and the FDLP: The Role of Academic Law Librarians in Promoting Democracy, 99 Law Libr. J. 695 (2007).
    JULIANNE — Palfrey, John. Born Digital. Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives. (all 3 excerpts from http://borndigitalbook.com/).

  2. Here is an interesting site => http://www.llrx.com/

    “LLRX.com is the premier free, independent, one person produced Web journal dedicated to providing legal, library, IT/IS, marketing and administrative professionals with the most up-to-date information on a wide range of Internet research and technology-related issues, applications, resources and tools.”

    Any thoughts on the content or usefulness?

    Enjoy the long weekend!

    -Jon

  3. Here is an interesting blog => http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/law_librarian_blog/

    • Jon, funny you should mention it because I’d had a random thought earlier in our course that was somewhat materialized on that blog just today:

      http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/law_librarian_blog/2010/06/forbes-worst-masters-degrees-mlis-ranks-25th-out-of-30.html

      The author makes a comparison between the profession of a law librarian to that of a nurse. It was a passing thought of mine that had come up during our discussion about the dialogue between Danner and Donovan, in which they argued over the characterization or definition of the term “profession,” and whether or not (or how) it could apply to librarianship. Though not wholly akin to their discussion, I had it in mind, in the most basic sense, that law librarianship can be compared to the nursing profession in that a law librarian provides [attorneys] assistance and tools with which to find knowledge and information, whereas a nurse provides [doctors] assistance and tools with which to provide medical care.

  4. Here’s a link to a law library blog that I found while scouring Google: http://librarianatlaw.blogspot.com/. It’s not updated frequently, but I thought it was funny that the blog is written by the Head of References of the University of Connecticut School of Law Library (I don’t want to say that three times fast…), which the author notes but quickly disclaims. This is the author’s (Lee Sims) personal blog and the entries are candid critiques of current law library news.


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